LNG, First Nations - It’s time to decide

May 23, 2018

For LNG in BC it’s crunch time. The LNG Alliance says the time is now – decide to move forward and build and then start selling Natural Gas in 2023 or 2024, which is projected to be the next market window.

 

LNG Canada recently appointed a joint venture engineering firm as the prime contractor for the Kitimat site the company has cleared and is preparing for the building of a $40 billion dollar facility. The company, however, is yet to make its final investment decision. All signs suggest that will happen in late 2018.

 

Unlike Kinder Morgan, the government of British Columbia is firmly behind the project and appears to be going out of its way to accommodate the development of the Liquefied Natural Gas industry. Looming in the background is Green Party Leader Andrew Weaver who is as opposed to LNG as he is to the movement of oil.

 

And what about First Nations? Are they in support of the project? The First Nations LNG Alliance is an organization that represents 15 communities along the TransCanada Pipeline route that support the pipeline and the LNG facilities.

 

We asked Haisla Nation Chief Councillor Crystal Smith to join us for a Conversation That Matters about the risks and the benefits of supporting LNG Canada and other proponents in the development of an energy-based projects.

 

Simon Fraser University’s Centre for Dialogue presents Conversations That Matter. Join veteran Broadcaster Stuart McNish each week for an important and engaging Conversation about the issues shaping our future.

 

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Why We Want Kinder Morgan Built, Cheam, Chief Ernie Crey

May 20, 2018

Why We Want Kinder Morgan Built

Cheam, Chief Ernie Crey

 

 

The Kinder Morgan pipeline is without a doubt the most divisive issue in Canada. It has the potential to tear at the fabric of our Confederation. The Federal Government, the governments of BC and Alberta and First Nations governments are all in a titanic battle.

 

A number of First Nations along the pipeline route do not want to see it built and others are anxious to see the oil flow through their territories.  The Frog Lake Nation of Alberta owns and operates an energy company and it says that without the pipeline, they can’t sell their oil. An outcome they say will doom them to continued poverty.

 

The Tsleil-Waututh Nation in British Columbia is adamantly opposed to the project and recently sent a delegation to Kinder Morgan’s annual general meeting in Houston to voice its concerns.

 

The various positions within indigenous communities reflect the divisions over the pipeline throughout the rest of the country. First Nations like cities and provinces have rights that require consultation, agreement and consent.

 

While many First Nations leaders are opposed to the pipeline, 33 Indigenous communities have signed agreements with Kinder Morgan supporting the project and they are speaking out because they say their position is being misrepresented. Simpcw Chief, Nathan Matthew made it clear his band supports the project and he stated that no other organization or First Nation has the authority to speak on the Simpcw’s behalf.

 

Cheam First Nations Chief Ernie Crey has taken to social and mainstream media to voice his support for the project. We invited Chief Crey to join us for a Conversation That Matters about his Nation’s reasons for supporting the building of the controversial pipeline.

 

Simon Fraser University’s Centre for Dialogue presents Conversations That Matter. Join veteran Broadcaster Stuart McNish each week for an important and engaging Conversation about the issues shaping our future.

 

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LNG = Fracking with Brad Hayes

May 10, 2018

Ep 19o

Brad Hayes

LNG = Fracking

 

Now that the Premier of British Columbia has gone out of his way to accommodate the building of a massive LNG production facility in Kitimat we have to ask, where will the gas come from?

The answer of course is, it comes from under the ground in both BC and Alberta.

Natural Gas is the byproduct of decayed plant and animal life that was compacted and pressurized by layers of sand and rock over millions of years. Deep under the earth’s crust in temperatures that exceed 120 degrees Celsius, the organic matter cooks and eventually the carbon bonds in the organic material break down and fossil fuels are formed. This is known as, "Primary Gas."

Secondary Natural Gas accompanies oil which cooks for many millions of years more.

Getting that gas out of the ground means drilling and it also means hydraulic fractured drilling also known as fracking.

What exactly is fracking? How is the operation carried out and more importantly is it a process we want to be a by-product of the LNG industry we’re inviting to set up shop in British Columbia?

We invited Brad Hayes, the Director of the Canadian Society of Unconventional Resources, an adjunct professor at the University of Alberta and a respected expert on fracking to join us for a Conversation That Matters about fracking.

Simon Fraser University’s Centre for Dialogue presents Conversations That Matter. Join veteran Broadcaster Stuart McNish each week for an important and engaging Conversation about the issues shaping our future.

Please become a Patreon subscriber and support the production of this program, with a $1 pledge https://goo.gl/ypXyDs

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First Nations and LNG with Ellis Ross

May 7, 2018

Ellis Ross

First Nations and LNG

 

Liquefied natural gas, LNG, is on the horizon in British Columbia.

 

The BC government supports it, and sees LNG exports as a source of revenue and jobs.

But will LNG plants and their associated natural-gas pipelines get built? If so, when?

There are obstacles along the way, and one is First Nations participation.

 

The public is often told that First Nations in BC are opposed to energy development, that they are in agreement with environmentalists who want to stop the development of carbon fuels in the province.

 

The First Nations LNG Alliance says that perception is both exaggerated and incorrect. The alliance includes communities between the northeast of the province and Kitimat, where two major LNG facilities are in the final stages of making investment decisions.

 

The Alliance is a collective of First Nations that states its objective is to participate in, and be supportive of, sustainable and responsible LNG development in the province.

 

Above all else, they say the creation of opportunities for First Nations men and women to find employment in their communities is a top priority. So is bringing in revenue to close the economic gap between Indigenous communities and the non-Indigenous.

 

We asked former Haisla Chief Councillor, Ellis Ross, now the MLA for Skeena to join us for a Conversation That Matters to talk about why he opposed the Northern Gateway Pipeline but supports the development of LNG in BC.  

 

 

Simon Fraser University’s Centre for Dialogue presents Conversations That Matter. Join veteran Broadcaster Stuart McNish each week for an important and engaging Conversation about the issues shaping our future.

Please become a Patreon subscriber and support the production of this program, with a $1 pledge https://goo.gl/ypXyDs

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LNG in an Age of Uncertainty

April 30, 2018

David Keane

LNG in an age of uncertainty

 

The Premier of British Columbia is standing on his head vowing to stop the increase in the flow of oil from Alberta. At the same time he is green lighting the development of LNG in his own province.

 

LNG is considered to be the clean alternative to carbon fuels and the Premier wants to see an increase in the amount of it produced in BC. When Natural Gas prices were high, the tax revenue from natural gas to the province was substantial.

 

Then, just as it seemed the industry was about to make final investment decisions in the development of large LNG processing facilities in BC, two things happened, the market for Natural Gas was flooded with new discoveries everywhere and the cost of production in BC soared.

 

As well, a host of new regulations and taxes were introduced in BC and the prospect of capitalizing on Asian demand for LNG came to an abrupt halt. The window of opportunity closed.

 

Energy experts now predict the next supply opportunity window is set to open in 2023. If BC hopes to be a participant in that market it has to decide now to either go ahead or turn its back on the market.

 

We asked David Keane, the CEO of the BC LNG Alliance to join us for a Conversation That Matters on the state of LNG in BC.

 

Simon Fraser University’s Centre for Dialogue presents Conversations That Matter. Join veteran Broadcaster Stuart McNish each week for an important and engaging Conversation about the issues shaping our future.

 

Please become a Patreon subscriber and support the production of this program, with a $1 pledge https://goo.gl/ypXyDs

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Precious Metals in the Green Economy

April 26, 2018

Precious Metals in the Green Economy

 

The world is turning to green technology in an effort to reduce our impact on the environment. It is a global movement moving at different speeds in different jurisdictions. All the same, we are all moving towards an energy transition.

What is rarely discussed is our relationship with the elements that are required to build green technology. Where will these elements come from?

Interestingly, they will come from the same places we currently mine.  We will still need to extract elements from Mother Earth, the difference will be in the end use but not in the source.

Precious metals play a vital role in computing technologies and particularly in cleaning the emissions that exit the tailpipe of gas and diesel vehicles. Platinum and Palladium, for example, is a rare and precious metal that is an absolute requirement in catalytic converters.

Research is underway to determine if palladium can not only speed up the rate of battery charging but also extend the life of the charge.

With more than one billion cars on the road around the world, we sat down with platinum and palladium miner Mike Jones for a Conversation That Matters about the ongoing role of metals in the green economy.

 

Simon Fraser University’s Centre for Dialogue presents Conversations That Matter. Join veteran Broadcaster Stuart McNish each week for an important and engaging Conversation about the issues shaping our future.

 

Please become a Patreon subscriber and support the production of this program, with a $1 pledge https://goo.gl/ypXyDs

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Treating Illness with Fecal Transplants: Dr Jeremy Burton

April 5, 2018

Jeremy Burton

Treating Illness with Fecal Transplants

 

What happens when your microbiome goes off the rails?

C Difficile infection is a common problem. What is C-Difficile you ask? Well it happens as a reaction to the consumption of some antibiotics. C-Diff for short, is a species of Gram-positive spore-forming bacteria accumulating in your gastrointestinal tract.

The symptoms can be diarrhoea, fever, nausea and abdominal pain.

There are a number of treatments, some work and some don’t. That’s because the bacteria may have already developed a resistance to antibiotics. That can mean a dramatic intervention may be required and one dramatic treatment option is fecal microbiota transplantation.

You’ve heard about fecal transplantation but that doesn’t mean it’s readily available. And it’s important to note it is filled with a wide range of challenges. Just as in organ transplant, there needs to be a match between the donor and the patient.

Canada has been an early adopter of this procedure and researchers are now asking if it can be applied in a number of other conditions such as diabetes and obesity. Those researchers are trying to determine if you can change the microbiome can you then change the health outcome.

We invited Dr Jeremy Burton the Deputy Director of the Canadian Centre for Human Microbiome and Probiotics to join us for a Conversation That Matters about the exciting research underway in treating your well-being by re-engineering the bacteria in your intestinal tract.

Simon Fraser University’s Centre for Dialogue presents Conversations That Matter. Join veteran Broadcaster Stuart McNish each week for an important and engaging Conversation about the issues shaping our future.

 

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The Diabolical Selling of Sugar to Kids (w/Mark Collison, Heart and Stroke Foundation Canada)

March 30, 2018

Does it ever seem to you that the marketing of food to kids has a sinister aura? Namely, let’s hook 'em on sugar and watch the sales skyrocket. Once you have them addicted, they’re a client for life.

You’re right – that is what’s happening, and marketers are doing it intentionally. Sugar, sugar, sugar all the time, and it has devastating lifelong health effects on children.

Heart and Stroke Canada wants the Federal Government to enact legislation that will put an end to the marketing of sugar-rich, highly processed junk foods to kids. They believe that marketing to kids is targeting a highly susceptible demographic and those should pick on someone their own size.

Of particular concern, is a bombardment technique that leads to a thing we discuss called the nag factor. What’s fueling the nag factor? Endless advertising - advertising the Stop Marketing to Kids coalition says has to be outlawed.

We asked Mark Collison of Heart and Stroke to join us for a Conversation That Matters about how the marketing of food to kids is affecting their lifelong health.

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Please become a Patreon subscriber and support the production of this program, with a $1 pledge https://goo.gl/ypXyDs

Simon Fraser University’s Centre for Dialogue presents Conversations That Matter. Join veteran Broadcaster Stuart McNish each week for an important and engaging Conversation about the issues shaping our future.

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Genomics Research in BC gets a Huge Boost w/Catalina Lopez-Correa

March 21, 2018

Catalina Lopez-Correa

Genomic Research in BC Gets a Huge Boost

 

Genomics is changing lives, it is reshaping economies and shifting health outcomes. British Columbia is at the leading edge in the implementation of genomic research and in practice.

The role of that research in BC took a big leap forward when six new projects in precision health care were awarded more than 60 million dollars in funding. Funding that helps establish British Columbia as a genomics-driven life sciences supercluster.

Precision health care is shifting the way we interact with our health, medical practitioners and the healthcare system. Utilizing genomics, we can diagnose potential health threats in advance and guide treatments that are specific to individuals like you and me.

Already, the BC Pharmacy Association is employing Pharmacogenomics to ensure you receive the right medication in the right dose at the right time. It doesn’t stop there, treatment for childhood diseases in indigenous populations and pharmacogenomics in childhood cancer treatment are two of the funded projects.

The investment is a validation of the extraordinary genomic research underway in BC.

We asked Genome BC Chief Science Officer Catalina Lopez-Correa to join us for a Conversation That Matters about how genomics is reshaping our lives.

Simon Fraser University’s Centre for Dialogue presents Conversations That Matter. Join veteran Broadcaster Stuart McNish each week for an important and engaging Conversation about the issues shaping our future.

 

Please become a Patreon subscriber and support the production of this program, with a $1 pledge https://goo.gl/ypXyDs

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The Ugly Truth About Supplements

March 18, 2018

Dr David Wang

The Ugly Truth about Supplements

 

Supplements - do you take them?

If you do, it’s probably because you want to be healthier. And if you take supplements there’s a good chance you pay attention to the food you buy and eat. More and more of us are turning to organic foods because we care about what we consume.

We’re doing a good job of checking labels to determine if foods have GMO’s, what are the additives in them, what is the nutritional value of the delicious meal you’re about to eat?

But do you examine the ingredients in the supplements you’re tossing back with a smoothie? Do you have any idea what’s in those gel caps, tablets and liquids?

If you take the time to read the label and examine the elements and then do the work of understanding what they are, you might very well be shocked to learn it’s a mixed bag.

 

We asked Dr David Wang to join us for a Conversation That Matters about why you need to be just as picky about nutraceuticals as you are about the food you eat.

Simon Fraser University’s Centre for Dialogue presents Conversations That Matter. Join veteran Broadcaster Stuart McNish each week for an important and engaging Conversation about the issues shaping our future.

 

Please become a Patreon subscriber and support the production of this program, with a $1 pledge https://goo.gl/ypXyDs

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